Urbino

Urbino appears to the visitor as a town that has preserved its historical form intact. Yet, though its roots push deep into the Renaissance, it nevertheless succeeds admirably in playing a role as a modern centre of culture and learning on an international plane.

It was the political and cultural genius and efforts of the illuminated 14th century prince, Federico of Montefeltro, that transformed what was an anonymous and hostile land into a historically well-defined territory. Today, Urbino is an almost obligatory step in the progress of anybody intent on exploring one of modern civilisation’s most important dimensions.

Nestling on a hill between the Foglia and Metauro rivers, the old ducal capital of Urbino extends towards the Adriatic sea to the east.

It was here that Federico had his dream of constructing a state organised on rational principles.
Urbino’s history combines exaltation with destruction, excitement with melancholy, and seduction with reservation: the fascination of the old capital of Montefeltro is both unique and unmistakable.
The visitor will inevitably retain a sense of wonder at what we he seen for many years to come.
Some of Urbino’s main events and festivals include: the festival of the Duke on the 15th August every year, evoking the age of the Renaissance, and the kite festival on the 1st Sunday in September.
Places to visit include the duke’s palace, the home of Raphael, the cathedral, the Oratorio delle grotte, and Albornoz castle.